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Pink Tiger in a Blue world

£800.00 £700.00

This is a departure for me as I rarely do animals as I am a portrait artist, but something about this Tiger gave me an idea to put a different slant. The Siberian tiger is white to match his/hers surroundings. I hope I have done this magnificent animal justice.

The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also called Amur tiger is a tiger subspecies inhabiting mainly the Sikhote Alin mountain region with a small population in southwest Primorye Province in the Russian Far East. The Siberian tiger once ranged throughout all of Korea, north-eastern China, Russian Far East, and eastern Mongolia. In 2005, there were 331393 adult and subadult Siberian tigers in this region, with a breeding adult population of about 250 individuals. The population had been stable for more than a decade due to intensive conservation efforts, but partial surveys conducted after 2005 indicate that the Russian tiger population was declining.[1] By 2015, the Siberian tiger population had increased to 480540 individuals in the Russian Far East, including 100 cubs.[3][4] A more detailed census revealed a total population of 562 wild Siberian tigers in Russia.[5]

This tiger subspecies was also called Korean tiger, Manchurian tiger, and Ussurian tiger, depending on the region where individuals were observed.[6][7][8]

The Siberian tiger and Bengal tiger subspecies rank among the biggest living cats.[8] An average adult male Siberian outweighs an average adult male lion by around 45.5 kg (100 lb).[9] A comparison of data on body weights of Siberian tigers indicates that up to the first half of the 20th century both males and females were on average heavier than post-1970 ones. Today’s wild Siberian tigers are smaller than Bengal tigers. Their reduced weight as compared to historical Siberian tigers may be due to a combination of causes: when captured, they were usually sick or injured and involved in a conflict situation with people.

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Description

This is a departure for me as I rarely do animals as I am a portrait artist, but something about this Tiger gave me an idea to put a different slant. The Siberian tiger is white to match his/hers surroundings. I hope I have done this magnificent animal justice.

The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also called Amur tiger is a tiger subspecies inhabiting mainly the Sikhote Alin mountain region with a small population in southwest Primorye Province in the Russian Far East. The Siberian tiger once ranged throughout all of Korea, north-eastern China, Russian Far East, and eastern Mongolia. In 2005, there were 331393 adult and subadult Siberian tigers in this region, with a breeding adult population of about 250 individuals. The population had been stable for more than a decade due to intensive conservation efforts, but partial surveys conducted after 2005 indicate that the Russian tiger population was declining.[1] By 2015, the Siberian tiger population had increased to 480540 individuals in the Russian Far East, including 100 cubs.[3][4] A more detailed census revealed a total population of 562 wild Siberian tigers in Russia.[5]

This tiger subspecies was also called Korean tiger, Manchurian tiger, and Ussurian tiger, depending on the region where individuals were observed.[6][7][8]

The Siberian tiger and Bengal tiger subspecies rank among the biggest living cats.[8] An average adult male Siberian outweighs an average adult male lion by around 45.5 kg (100 lb).[9] A comparison of data on body weights of Siberian tigers indicates that up to the first half of the 20th century both males and females were on average heavier than post-1970 ones. Today’s wild Siberian tigers are smaller than Bengal tigers. Their reduced weight as compared to historical Siberian tigers may be due to a combination of causes: when captured, they were usually sick or injured and involved in a conflict situation with people.

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